YOU SAY EBELSKIVER, I SAY FALAFEL


Have you heard of ebelskivers? With a fun name that twists the tongue around, ebelskivers are creatures conceived in Denmark, designed to make your mouth water and your waistline expand. Think pancakes in round shape, served as a bite-size delicacy. To properly make them, you need a pan like this one.

With that pan calling the Bewitching Kitchen home, I was eager to make my first batch of ebelskivers. The perfect opportunity shaped up: a bunch of golfing friends came to stay with us and play in a tournament with Phil. My plan was to offer them a special breakfast on Sunday morning before they headed to the golf course. But, I kept that plan well hidden. It would be a surprise. Guess who was really surprised? Yours truly. Their performance on the golf course on Saturday made them all want to get up at the crack of dawn and go practice for a couple of hours before the final outing. Breakfast? Who needs breakfast when there’s golf? They grabbed a bunch of cereal bars and off they went. Oh, well. So much for a carefully planned ebelskiver extravaganza…

So I was left with a virgin ebelskiver pan. Then serendipity hit. I was talking to my friend Elaine and she mentioned making falafel in her “special pan.”  She had no idea I had the same type of pan! You can check her recent blog post about it with a jump here. It turns out hers is a slightly different version, with a larger number os smaller cavities. Falafel… We both love falafel. My pan would no longer be a virgin.

FALAFEL
(adapted from Elaine’s foodbod)

250g dried chickpeas, placed in a large bowl of water and soaked overnight
1 medium shallot, peeled and roughly chopped
1 bunch flat leaf parsley
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
1/4 cayenne pepper (optional)
Juice of 1 lemon
Salt to taste
chickpea flour, about 1/4 cup (depending on moisture of your mixture)
1/2 teaspoon baking powder

Wash and drain the chickpeas.

Put everything except the flour in a food processor and chop to a chunky crumb, then put it all into a large bowl. Add the baking powder and enough flour to bring the mixture together in your hands, then create small balls of the mix and flatten them slightly to make the falafel shape.

Put your ebelskiver pan over a low/medium heat and place a small amount of oil in each dip and allow it to heat up briefly. Place a falafel in each dip and cook until done, moving the pan around to make sure it heats evenly.  Turn the falafels gently with a fork when the underside is golden brown, to brown the other side. Remove them to a low oven while you prepare the rest of the meal, or serve right away.

ENJOY!

to print the recipe, click here

 

Comments: These turned out delicious! At first I thought that it would make too much filling and I would have a bunch of falafel mixture leftover. Not the case. For my size pan, with the seven medium-sized cavities, it was almost the exact amount. Because my falafels were bigger than Elaine’s, I decided to add a little baking powder  to help lift them a little more. After I “fried” them on both sides, I placed them in our small toaster oven just to keep warm while I finished the rest of the meal. Great to have an additional use for this pan, in fact I have a few savory recipes that might cook very well in it. A fun toy to play with, that’s for sure….

I served ours drizzled with a mixture of yogurt and tahini, seasoned with a touch of salt and lemon juice. It was quite tasty,  but unfortunately the photo did not do it justice, so I skipped sharing it. Elaine served hers over hummus, her picture is worthy of a cooking magazine. Go check it out…

😉

Sharing is caring… while you’re here, grab a pin!

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22 thoughts on “YOU SAY EBELSKIVER, I SAY FALAFEL

  1. Ah, that’s so kind of you to want to surprise the group with a yummy breakfast before golf. I’ve never heard of ebelskivers but falafel sounds like an ingenious use of your new pan. They’re so cute and perfectly formed too. The recipe sounds yummy, I need to add it to my list – such a perfect nibble. Wonder if I could sub almond or coconut flour (don’t currently have chickpea flour on hand I don’t think).

    Liked by 1 person

    • I would use almond flour indeed – the coconut flour sometimes behaves in odd ways as far as texture goes, I would rather use the almond. Or any flour, a white whole wheat, regular white flour – just a little bit so they don’t get too heavy

      yeap, the road to hell is paved with good intentions, isn’t it? 😉

      Like

  2. I am up far too early and a friend who has been up all night said there was a post on falafel in ebelskiver pan and it’s you! How exciting! Hello Sally!! How are you, and those look ab fabulous and you have inspired me to dig out my pan and give it a go, I have always found the deep frying part a complete and utter performance and so only made falafel a couple of times, but this is such a good idea, can’t wait to try. love to you and Phil xx Jo

    Liked by 1 person

    • wow! Isn’t it amazing that you would land here through a friend? and a friend who stays up all night! 😉

      I hope you try it – I agree with you, the deep frying is such a pain!

      Like

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