A DIFFERENT KIND OF COOKIE SWAP

I like to keep the blog varied. Never two bread posts in a row. Never two savory recipes in a row. But never say never, as I am about to break my own rules. My latest post involved cookies, and here you have another one. But, but, but…. I got so excited about this, I cannot wait to share. A cookie swap that is not quite what you think: you swap portions of a stamped cookie dough, forming a totally new pattern. I keep thinking about all the possibilities of mixing and matching. Shapes, designs, colors, cookie formulas (think chocolate and vanilla for a shocking color contrast).

MIX-AND-MATCH LEMON SUGAR COOKIES
(inspired by several sources)

113g unsalted butter (1/2 cup)
30g egg (whisk one egg and measure the amount)
1/4 cup honey (about 60 mL)
zest of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon lemon extract
50g granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
320g all-purpose flour

to decorate (optional):
vodka or everclear or lemon extract
dust luster powder in gold, pearl white, or any desired color

Melt the butter and set aside to cool slightly, but do not let it get solid.

Beat the 30g egg in the bowl of a Kitchen Aid mixer bowl until the yolk and white are fully mixed.  Add the honey, and lemon flavoring. You can do this step by hand using a whisk.

In another bowl, mix the sugar with the lemon zest and rub the zest with your fingers to release all the oils. Add the salt, then incorporate the mixture into the egg using the flat beater of the Kitchen Aid in medium-speed. Beat well, then slowly add the melted butter, constantly mixing.

Add flour (reserve about 1/2 cup) in very low-speed and mix in until you have a dough that is solid enough to knead. Remove the dough from the Kitchen Aid and add the rest of the flour by hand, you may not need the full amount. Pat the dough into a disc, wrap in plastic and place in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Roll it out to a thickness compatible with your cookie press, then press two or three patterns using any type of design you like. Using a small round cookie cutter remove the centers and swap them, as shown in this picture:

Freeze the cookies on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper for 15 minutes while you heat the oven to 350F. To avoid distortion of the cookies during baking, transfer the frozen cookies to a room temperature sheet, using the parchment paper to move them.

Bake for about 12 minutes, until edges start to get golden, but do not over bake. Let them cool for a few minutes on the baking sheet, than remove to a rack to cool completely.

If desired, use luster dust powder mixed with vodka or lemon extract to paint the surface.

ENJOY!

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: I am over the moon with these! You don’t have to go through the additional step of painting them, the pattern looks nice even if the cookies are kept plain, but I love working with luster dust. There is no need for precision, each cookie turns out a little different.

You can use any recipe that keeps the shape during baking, and always freeze the cut cookies before sticking in the oven. Another thing to keep in mind is to transfer the frozen cookies to a room temperature baking sheet, because sometimes baking them over a frozen cookie sheet might cause warping. By transferring to a room temperature surface, you avoid that problem.

I cannot take full credit for this idea. I am a member of a great cookie group on Facebook (Molded Cookies of the World) and the moderator (Dawn Williams) has been playing with different cookie molds, joining them together. I decided to try it with the cookie stamps from Nordicware. They are sturdy, wonderful to use, and every single swap I did worked perfectly.

I am already planning my next batch… and the one after that…

ONE YEAR AGO: Scary Good Recipes for your next Halloween

TWO YEARS AGO: Pumpkin Sourdough

THREE YEARS AGO: First Monday Favorite

FOUR YEARS AGO: Secret Recipe Club: Paalak Paneer, a Farewell Post

FIVE YEARS AGO: In My Kitchen, November 2015

SIX YEARS AGO: Helen Fletcher’s Oatmeal Cookies

SEVEN YEARS AGO: Thai-Style Pesto with Brown Rice Pasta

EIGHT YEARS AGO: Shrimp with Spicy Orange Sauce

NINE YEARS AGO:  A Simple Appetizer (Baked Ricotta)

TEN YEARS AGO: Sour Cream Sandwich Bread

ELEVEN YEARS AGO: Pasta with Zucchini Strands and Shrimp

13 thoughts on “A DIFFERENT KIND OF COOKIE SWAP

  1. Oh my oh my!!! Such a great idea. And I just bought for the geo stamps and they arrived yesterday, calling my name to be used. Of course, now I need luster powder. Between you and Matt, my shopping cart always seems filled these days with baking supplies. Thanks for doing the unexpected and posted a second cookie recipe.

    Like

  2. Hello again,
    A couple of questions…
    I am looking at your pretty scalloped edges. I see your rolled dough with circles with straight edges. Did you layer two circles, a larger scalloped with a center placed on top and then a straight edge pressed circle with the cut out center? Am I making sense??!

    Do you use Bakell luster powder? Is luster powder hand painted on or airbrushed?

    Cheers,
    Anne

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Anne…. I have a series of cookie cutters with scalloped edges (they come in a single set with 10 I think, from very small to very large). So I used two sizes to cut the edges of the large cookie and the centers. I like the way it looks more elegant, but a simple edged cookie cutter also works – you need that for the cookie stamp anyway as it does not cut the dough, just imprints the image.

      as to the luster dust, you cannot air brush that – what I do is to place a small amount of vodka or everclear in a little plastic tray used for watercolor work, and then I add the colors of luster dust in different spots of the tray – then it is just mixing with a brush a little powder with the vodka, swirl, and use. Pretty soon you learn how much powder to use, the more vodka, the less evident the final color. I love working with it. I bought my sets at etsy, to begin I advise you to get gold, white, silver and bronze – with just those (or even just white and gold) you can do a lot – make sure they are the luster kind, with a shine.

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  3. I *love* these. They are so pretty and look like a lot of fun to make. Darn you, Sally Newton, for turning me onto another FB page that I need to join. LOL I’ve been trying to ween myself off of social media because I spend far too much time browsing. Now there is this molded cookie page that I asked to join. Bad, Sally, bad, bad Sally.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am so so SO SORRY…. (insert evil laughter) – hope to see you there… it is a fantastic group, and I am going broke from buying way too many springerle molds…. (you’ve been warned)

      Like

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