TURKEY MEATLOAF

Here I am to share another recipe that tasted wonderful but would not be invited to participate in a Beauty Contest. Meatloaf is not easy on the eyes but this one in particular was a showstopper for the taste buds. Lower in carbs than most versions, because it relies on almond flour instead of breadcrumbs. Quite loaded with veggies. We both gave enthusiastic thumbs up, so ignore the looks. They are skin-deep, after all…

TURKEY MEATLOAF
(inspired by Life is But a Dish)

1 pound ground turkey
1/2 cup almond flour
1 cup shredded carrots (about 2 large carrots)
1/2 cup chopped fresh spinach (not baby spinach)
1/3 cup feta cheese, crumbled
1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 egg
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon chipotle pepper, ground

for glaze:
1/4 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Add all the ingredients into a large bowl (minus the ingredients for the glaze). Using a fork or clean hands, mix until everything is fully incorporated.

Mix ingredients for the glaze in a small bowl and reserve.

Line a sheet pan with parchment paper and pour meat onto pan. Use your hands to form into a loaf shape, trying to keep it level so it cooks evenly. Bake for 25 minutes, then remove and brush glaze all over. Place back in the oven for another 25 to 30 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees.

Remove and let cool for 10 minutes before serving.

ENJOY!

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: What do tomatoes and avocados have to do with the meatloaf? They were the side dish, and I absolutely must share the picture because the tomatoes came from our own backyard, thanks to the gardening efforts of the husband… Aren’t they gorgeous?

The meatloaf has a very delicate texture, and cooked perfectly in our small Breville oven, so there was no need to even heat the kitchen up. Leftovers were around for a couple of days and tasted as good if not better than the first time. I made it again the following week, and you know how it goes: for a food blogger, repeating a recipe right away is a huge endorsement. It goes to our regular rotation, a nice change from our default turkey burgers.

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5 thoughts on “TURKEY MEATLOAF

  1. Absolutely love most kinds of meatloaf and do not mind its look on the plate at all. Altho’ turkey mince is certainly available at most supermarkets here, it is not a protein I have often used . . . nor have I reached too often for almond flour . . . add your spinach and feta and a lot of flavour is promised. Shall try soonest and send the recipe to local meatloaf loving friends as well . . the only tweaking I can see is perchance losing some flavour exchanging the tomato sauce for passata plus . . . to try and lessen the sugar impact . . . methinks one change we have found out – food in the US is appreciated at a much ‘sweeter level. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ . . . !

    Liked by 1 person

    • if you use passata, just keep in mind it will bring a little more liquid – you might want to adjust the flour a bit. I use a “no sugar added” ketchup, which has less sweetness than regular brands, but I am not sure it is widely available. Next time I will use chili sauce (that kind used in little serving sauces for oysters) because I think it will work nicely there too. Even thought ketchup has sugar, it does have a sour component with all the vinegar that goes into it, and it adds a nice taste to the meatloaf itself – on the topping, you could definitely omit it or use something else, I tend to like the contrast of sweetness with the sharpness of the feta, but that’s all very personal πŸ˜‰ It is really your kitchen, your rules!

      Liked by 1 person

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