One of the only shows I watch on FoodTV these days is The Kitchen, with Marcela Valladolid, Sunny Anderson, Katie Lee, Jeff Mauro,  and the one and only Geoffrey Zakarian. The crowd has great chemistry together, each person bringing something different and fun to the show. Zakarian offers that touch of class and knowledge, sophisticated without ever being obnoxious, a tricky line to negotiate. Recently he shared a recipe with his characteristic signature: elegant, complex, but not overly fussy.  Chicken breasts filled with ricotta,  wrapped in prosciutto, crisped up on the stove top and finished in the oven. A quick pan sauce beautifully crowned the dish, bringing capers to the party. I have a weak spot for capers, in case you did not notice yet…  As I watched him prepare the recipe, I could not stop thinking that the whole thing would be perfect for sous-vide.  And sous-vide was the path I took. It was O.M.G. delicious. With the most enthusiastic happy dance to go with it.  Of course, if you don’t have the Anova gadget, don’t let that stop you.  I give you the exact method used by Zakarian in the show. However, I tell you, the texture of the meat cooked at that magical 141 F for hours… was superb. Superb!


(adapted from G. Zakarian)

3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 cup (about 60g)  sun-dried tomatoes, chopped (divided)
150g ricotta cheese
4 tablespoons chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh sage
1 large egg yolk
salt and freshly cracked black pepper
9 slices prosciutto
1 tablespoon canola oil
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed
1 shallot, finely diced
1/4 cup (60 mL) Verjus (or white wine)
1/2  cup (120 mL) chicken stock
1 tablespoon butter

If using regular cooking, heat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Using a small knife, make an incision in the top rounded end of a chicken breast, cutting through the center and to the ends without breaking the sides, to form a pocket for the stuffing.

Combine 1/2 cup of the tomatoes, ricotta, walnuts, sage and egg yolk in a small bowl and season with salt and pepper. Using a spoon (or place the filling into a piping bag without a tip), stuff each chicken breast with 1/3 of the ricotta mixture. Season the chicken with salt and pepper, then lay the prosciutto into sheets of three pieces each, and roll around each stuffed breast. Heat the canola oil in a large, ovenproof saute pan until almost smoking. Sear the chicken breasts on the seam side of the prosciutto, then flip and sear the other side.Transfer the whole pan to the hot oven until the center of the chicken registers 160 degrees F, about 15 minutes.

If using sous-vide method: wrap each piece in plastic, then seal in a foodsaver type bag. Submerge in a water bath set to 141 F for 4 hours. When the time is up, remove the meat from the package, dry well and proceed to browning both sides on the stove top.

For both types of cooking, continue to make a pan sauce:  remove the chicken from the pan, add 1/2 cup of the sun-dried tomatoes, capers and shallots and cook over medium-high heat for 1 minute to soften the shallots. Add the Verjus to deglaze the pan, the chicken stock and cook until reduced by half, then swirl in the butter. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Slice the chicken and serve with the sauce.


to print the recipe, click here


Comments: I had a bit of a tough time filling the chicken. First I tried it as recommended, without a tip in the piping bag, but my bag was too thin, not sturdy enough to force the filling in. I tried with a tip, but the largest one I had was not wide enough and kept plugging with the pieces of walnuts. Since I was going to wrap the pieces with plastic anyway, I ended up cutting a slit around the side, opening the meat like a book, then rolling the prosciutto around. During the sous-vide cooking, it all turned into a perfectly shaped package. If you have a sturdy piping bag, it should work well.

What I love about sous-vide is how flexible you can be with timing. I served this meal for dinner on a super busy Sunday, in which we had no idea when we would be ready to finally sit down to eat. I set the water bath at 3pm and knew that whenever we wanted to have dinner, it would be a matter of 10 minutes to sear the pieces, and make the pan sauce. I had side dishes already made, just waiting to be re-heated. Easy but very impressive dinner.  Meat was perfectly cooked, the prosciutto gets all crusty and salty and tasty. And the sauce… capers are the perfect addition.  Zakarian really knows his way around food, Iron Chef that he is. And his beautiful gray hair only adds to his charm. Partial? Me? You’d think?  😉

About that Verjus: If you don’t have it, use white wine or simply chicken stock.  I am getting more and more fond of its subtle flavor, the way it brings mild acidity to a sauce or dressing.  And, by the way, did you know that a little Verjus mixed with carbonated water is a fantastic drink? Elaine tried it first and raved about it. Some people add sweetener, but we both like it straight. I am very fond of carbonated water with drops of bitters such as Angostura, so I’m not surprised that Verjus pleased me so much.

But, I digress. This is about the Zakarian’s recipe, and you definitely need to try it!  Perfect for a dinner party, you can assemble the chicken before, sear it quickly and bake it. Your guests will be impressed, thinking you slaved away for hours. But truth is, you did not…


ONE YEAR AGO: Amazing Apricot Bars

TWO YEARS AGO: Spiralizer Fun

THREE YEARS AGO: Linguine with Cauliflower Pesto

FOUR YEARS AGO: Carriage House Apple-Walnut Pie

FIVE YEARS AGO: Chicken Marsala

SIX YEARS AGO:  Home, sweet home

SEVEN YEARS AGO: Levain Bread with Caramelized Onions




  1. You are going to make me get a sous-vide device. I just know it. If they had one at the WS outlet it would be in my house right now…. dang! This looks delicious!

    P.S. The Kitchen is a Sunday morning ritual for me! And GZ is on my list of future husbands, even if he doesn’t know it (or doesn’t agree). Adore him!


    • he he he… one of my future husbands… great one! Well, I can totally understand, he makes my list too, such a classy and wonderful guy… Love the way he dresses too.

      If you get a sous vide, the Anova is really the option – small, so you can store it in a drawer. The other machines are soooo big, more like the water baths we have in the lab. A cat could swim inside. Well, if a cat liked swimming, that is…


  2. where can I find the recipe you posted about using cauliflower rice for substitute tortillas? I lost it

    On Thu, Sep 29, 2016 at 1:02 AM, Bewitching Kitchen wrote:

    > sallybr posted: “One of the only shows I watch on FoodTV these days is The > Kitchen, with Marcela Valladolid, Sunny Anderson, Katie Lee, Jeff Mauro, > and the one and only Geoffrey Zakarian. The crowd has great chemistry > together, each person bringing something different an” >


  3. No sous-vides over here (a few rogue sous chefs) but I’m seriously liking the sounds of this recipe and may have to give it a go using the conventional method. ps: I’ve made a version of your Brazilian shrimp twice since you posted your Olympic menu – we absolutely love it! Thank you for all the delicious inspiration lovely lady.


    • cannot beat the texture – sometimes for some cuts of meat I had to tweak and change temperature and timing a little, but once you hit the combination you like, it always works the same way. Very reproducible..


  4. What a great dish. Love your blog and recipes
    I am following your blog. Would you be interested to be a Guest poster with us, and share some of your awesome recipes on our blog?

    Have a look at: and leave me a note in the comments with a link to a recipe on your blog, if you’re interested. That will be just fantastic. Hope to hear from you soon 😊


  5. Like you, I’ve greatly reduced my viewing of Food Network shows. I used to tune in for hours daily and now can go a week without looking in. Zakarian is one of its few bright spot. He brings a touch of class to each and every show that he’s a part of. This dish sounds wonderful, Sally, and is just the kind I would expect from Geoffrey. Besides, prosciutto makes everything better. I only wish we could figure out a way to add it to ice cream. 🙂


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